2727 East Lemmon Ave, Dallas, TX 75204
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Sam Hamra, MD

  •   4131 N. Central Expressway #950
    Dallas, TX 75231
  •   (214) 754-9001
  •   Website
  •   Email

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Bio.
Practice
Description

Dr. Hamra was born and raised in Oklahoma and completed undergraduate studies, medical school, and general surgery training at the University of Oklahoma. He completed his plastic surgery training at the Institute of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at New York University Medical Center.

He is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Boardof Plastic Surgery, and is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, and the American Association of Plastic Surgeons.

Dr. Hamra also serves as Clinical Professor in the Department of Plastic Surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, has published widely in the plastic surgery literature, and lectures extensively worldwide.



 



 

If you have had a facelift and are pleased with the results, wonderful! But if you have had a facelift and are disappointed with the final result, know that you are not alone, and that something can be done. If you are considering a facelift, but wonder what went wrong after seeing friends and celebrities who have gone through the surgery, you've come to the right place for answers. I have spent most of my professional life developing the Composite Facelift, a facial rejuvenation operation to produce youthful anatomical changes without creating a facelifted look - the stigma of surgery. What came as a pleasant surprise was that, for patients having a second or even third facelift, this same procedure can erase the unwanted signs of prior surgery. The Composite Facelift is a next-generation alternative to standard procedures. It takes longer to perform and longer to heal, but yields longer-lasting, more natural-looking results. The Composite Facelift is based on the concept that the face ages as one dynamic, cohesive unit, rather than as a series of static, independent parts.